Community Medicine Week 4: Recognized

” There is undoubtedly a lot of pressure that comes with recognition, which can be a good thing and a bad thing all at the same time.”

– Prabal Gurung

I had just finished another clinic duty and was walking towards the tricycle terminal found just behind the public market. I was in the middle of one of my usual daydreams when I was suddenly pulled back into reality by an eager “Hello po, doktora!”. Looking up, I saw that it was one of the tricycle drivers. He was already pulling away from the terminal, a passenger on board his vehicle, but when he saw me, he took time to greet me and even call out at his fellow drivers, informing them that I needed a ride. The man I assumed to be a foreman of sorts directed me to an empty tricycle and immediately informed the driver where I was going home to. I didn’t have to say anything. They already knew.

It felt strange to be recognized. I honestly couldn’t remember how I got acquainted with the tricycle driver, if he consulted at the barangay health station (BHS), at the rural health unit (RHU), or maybe even visited our foster home in Sulsugin as an acquaintance or relative of our foster mom. There was nothing about my appearance that may have tipped him of my identity. I wasn’t in scrubs, wasn’t wearing an ID, nor carrying any of my medical tools. The tricycle driver simply knew that I was their doctor.

Going into this rotation, I knew that it was going to be a challenge being the sole doctor at the barangay health station. With Luksuhin Ibaba being the largest and most populated barangay in Alfonso, I had the additional challenge of having slightly more patients than my co-interns. That said, maybe it was inevitable that people would start actively seeking out this sole doctor. For some of them, you’re the only doctor they’ll ever get to see.

It really is such a different world here in the community, compared to what I know in UP-PGH. Back in the hospital, my patience would repeatedly get tested after being called “Nurse! Nurse!”, “Ate! Ate”, or worse “Ineng! Ineng!” by patients and their watchers. All these, even after all these years and after finally earning the right to wear my Intern’s coat. I’d all but grown tired of correcting them about my confusing position as ‘almost a doctor’. But here in the community, even without the coat, people recognize me as their doctor. And though this initially brought me delight, thinking that, at last, I’ve sort of arrived! I actually talk knowledgeably and act skillfully enough to be seen as a physician!, the recognition now brings a little bit of panic in me. For I once again realize that to be called and recognized as a doctor is more than just a title, it is really such a big responsibility. Being a doctor makes people put their utmost trust in you. There will be moments when you’ll literally have lives on your hands.

“…to be called and recognized as a doctor is more than just a title, it is really such a big responsibility.”

Two more weeks remain of my stay as the intern-in-charge of Barangay Luksuhin Ibaba, and I’m planning to make the most of every moment. I’ll do my best to prove worthy of my patients’ trust and their everyday greetings of “Hello, doktora!”.

Community Medicine Week 3: In Good Company

“People are always good company when they are doing what they really enjoy.” 

– Samuel Butler

A big part of Barangay Luksuhin Ibaba is found along the major highway of Alfonso, the long road that stretches from its welcome arc and passes through several barangays before arriving at the town proper. However, a part of Luksuhin Ibaba’s Purok 3, the largest and most populated of the three, is a bit more secluded. Nasa looban, as the locals would say. It is a part that can only be reached after passing through several small passageways, zigzagging this way and that. That said, the residents of this part of the barangay find it a bit difficult to reach the barangay health station (BHS), which is located along the highway. It is quite the walk towards the Sulsugin-Luksuhin road, where they will be able to ride a tricycleon the way to the BHS.

And so, the barangay health team [that is, the barangay health workers (BHWs) and I] decided to hold a satellite clinic day last Thursday, February 2, 2017, at this part of Purok 3, so as to reach out to those unable to go to the BHS. Nanay Linda, one of our BHWs, generously offered the use of her house as the host of this satellite clinic. We converted the dining area into a clinic of some sorts, bringing along even the height chart from the BHS.


The most memorable patient encounter I had at our Purok 3 satellite clinic would have to be Lola L.M., who I wouldn’t have thought was already 94-years-old. Still strong for her age, she had a smile on her face as she entered Nanay Linda’s dining room, albeit with some difficulty due to her aching legs. Lola  L.M. was a known hypertensive, but she admitted having difficulty complying with her medications. Through the efforts of our BHW, she would have her BP monitored, sharing that the highest reading reached up to 200/100 mmHg. Lola L.M. had a bit of difficulty hearing as well, so she had one of her neighbors, Nanay A.C. (also the one who accompanied her there at the satellite clinic), help her understand my questions as I continued history-taking. I tried to probe as to reasons why she was poorly compliant to her medications. It was then that Lola L.M. began to tear up as she related how she was already living alone, how all her children already had their own families and had moved out of Alfonso, how she couldn’t commute, much less walk to the main road, all the way to the BHS.

 I couldn’t imagine how a 94-year-old lady, even if she was as strong as Lola L.M. was,  could live alone. It was truly saddening. I thought perhaps that beyond her uncontrolled hypertension, beyond her muscle pains, what Lola L.M. was really suffering from was loneliness. Thank God for neighbors and friends like Nanay A.C., who take time to help her with whatever she may need. At the end of the day, I was really happy to have been able to come see Lola L.M. and the other patients who found it difficult to reach the BHS. 
In the true spirit of Filipino hospitality, Nanay Linda, assisted by the other BHWs, prepared a feast of sorts, food that wasn’t just limited for us, the health team, but offered to every patient who came to consult at the clinic. My tummy had a hard time keeping up with all the food they prepared, but of course, I gamely tried all the dishes.


The sudden downpour of rain that came in the afternoon, a few minutes after I saw the last patient, paved the way for lively chatter among our barangay health team. This, of course, could not be complete without more food – we had coffee/hot choco + pan de sal during the long conversation. It was stimulating to be among such people, whose friendship and bond were apparent for all to see. They talked about their work. They talked about recent events happening within the barangay and beyond. They talked about their families. They talked about their past interns. They shared all sorts of stories that I happily listened to. I could tell that despite it being a volunteer job,  despite there being some problems along the way, these women, when it comes right down to it, enjoyed what they were doing. After the sky cleared up a bit, I went home that day with my stomach full and my heart happy to have spent a day in good company.