Community Medicine Week 5: Familiar Paths

“Home isn’t a place. It’s a person.”
– Stephanie Perkins

Tita Nini, the midwife of Barangay Luksuhin Ibaba, and I were walking towards the tricycle terminal, together with one of our Barangay Health Workers, Nanay Aida, after another long Wednesday clinic day. Wednesday was our busiest clinic day, the day when most of the patients came to consult, especially the pregnant women who were to be seen by the midwife for their prenatal check-up. That said, it was quite understandable why the three of us were eager to go home and rest a bit.

We were halfway towards the Luksuhin Public Market when Tita Nini remembered she had to check something out at one of the local parlors. Parlor-parlor din ‘pag may time! Nanay Aida offered to come with her. I smiled and said that I’ll go ahead of them.
“Sigurado ka ba, dok?” asked Tita Nini, looking a bit reluctant to let me go off alone. “Kaya mo ba mag-isa?”
“Ay, oo naman po, Tita Nini! Kayang-kaya!” I laughed, reassuringly. My two companions heartily laughed along while waving good-bye and walking towards the direction of the local parlor.

As I proceeded towards the tricycle terminal on my own, I thought about the ease at which I reiterated that I was fine on my own. I also realized that it was true, that I could easily head back to Barangay Sulsugin by myself, that I no longer feared getting lost, that I knew my way back to my foster home, that a lot about Luksuhin Ibaba has become familiar.

Five weeks can never be enough to fully understand a place and a way of living, but in this very short time, I’ve grown to be fond of these paths. It is a far out cry from my first week, during which I felt like a lost wanderer most of the time. I remember being so wary of having to commute everyday just to reach my assigned barangay. I remember being so afraid of getting lost, of ending up who knows where with no idea how to get back home. But now, the paths have become familiar. The place has really grown on me.

Exif_JPEG_420
The barangay health workers of Luksuhin Ibaba, Dr. PJ Francisco (Family and Community Medicine resident), and I after our vital signs OSCE || It’s been a great five weeks. Thank you for making me feel right at home! :)

But more than the place, what I’ve really grown fond of are the people. Also among my fears upon starting out was feeling a bit lonely amidst all the new people. Though I’ve never been much of a shy person, there is still always that worry that there’ll be difficulty getting along with people. But everyone here has been more than welcoming. The new-found friends in my health team as well as within the other people of the community will surely never be forgotten. I’ve learned a lot from them about the simplicity of life, the dedication to work, and the importance of family. Because of them, despite being a mere visitor, I felt that I found something of a home here in Luksuhin Ibaba and in Sulsugin.

As my community medicine rotation is slowly coming to an end, I hope I was able to contribute something, no matter how little, for the betterment of the people of Luksuhin Ibaba.

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