Live While We’re Young

I’m a little behind on my writing, aren’t I? Okaay. Maybe not just a little. Ugh. As much as I’d like to blame the whole ‘I-can’t-access-Wordpress-what-on-earth-is-wrong-with-my-Internet?!’ situation, that’s not really the real problem here. Once again, I found myself caught in between my two worlds. I spent any free time I had, resting while I could, spending time with my loved ones, and indulging in good books, movies, and dramas. I am such a lazy writer, gah. 

Thus, here is my effort to get back on the road of the written word. I have at least two blog entries I have to write to catch-up (will work on those soon!), but before I backtrack, I’d better get these thoughts written down before I get too lazy again… #internshipissoooooootiringyetfun #howtomaketimeforwritingpo

As we were ending our Ophthalmology rotation (much to my absolute regret, see more in a future blog post), I was suddenly struck with an unexplicable sense of impending doom. It was weird. At the back of my head, I wondered if something bad was going to happen, or if it was a symptom of some sorts (Med Tidbit: feeling a sense of impending doom could actually point to a variety of diseases, including  anxiety attacks, depression, myocardial infarction, and even aortic dissection). Thinking back, it was probably just because we were starting our Pedia rotation the next day after. Something about dealing with such a toxic rotation, and the fact that I’ve never been really good with kids, must have had me in jitters. And the only bad thing that happened that day was that I forgot my umbrella and got wet from the starting drizzles. 

And now, all of a sudden, I find myself halfway through Pedia. It wasn’t bad at all. In fact, there are several moments when it was actually fun.

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Weeks 1-2 of Pedia Internship consisted on unlimited charting at the OPD Sick Child Clinic and the numerous Subspecialty Clinics, and at night, ER back-up duties. Our three-woman duty team did great! Jobs tend to get a lot easier when you’re working with awesome people. But, since it’s the PGH PER we’re talking about, it is inevitable that things get a little rough every once in a while…
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And we end up pretty tired from it all. But of course, being the benign team that we are, we do get short nap times. :)) PER Triage hits! #kinderjoypamore #presentingKatyFairy || Photo credit (c) JB Besa — stolen shot! 
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Always a treat to go on post duty binge eating with these two! :)) Much to the regret of my stomach and wallet though… Haha! The post duty sleep that soon follows this is quite something as well, and the eventual realization that things have once again come full circle and you have to repeat the whole Pre-Duty-Post cycle once again. Haaaay Buhay Medisina! || Photo credit (c) Myza Espallardo

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Weeks 3-4 sent me back to the Pedia Wards and this time around, I got to spend time with the Hema Onco patients. One of the challenges of being a Hema Onco (HO) Intern was that you went on duty alone and you were semi-in-charge of all 15 HO patients admitted for the tour of your duty. Mini-JWAPOD-ship every duty!

Still, the greatest challenge for the HO intern was probably training your heart to deal with the hardships of caring for children with cancer. It honestly broke my heart, seeing all these children, some as young as 11 months old to adolescents at the bringe of adulthood, dealing with such a complicated thing such as cancer.

One time, when I was in the middle of monitoring duties, 18-year-old L.O. (not her real name) caught me off-guard with such a difficult question. As she held her arm out so I could take her blood pressure and pulse rate, wearing such a sad expression on her face, she asked me, “Dok, kailan po ba gagaling ‘tong leukemia?“. I honestly struggled with an appropriate answer, completely unsure of how I should go about it. I went with a general reply, saying that patients, being different from one another, also responded to treatment regimens differently. She only had to do what she ought, be compliant with her medications and to take care of her self, so we could hope for her best shot at recovery.

It was a sad reality, what these children have to deal with. Instead of spending time playing, having fun, learning, making friends, discovering the world and what it had to offer, they were stuck in a hospital, getting their blood examined daily, dealing with medications and diagnostics here and there. They were forced to struggle with the war of life versus death, when they haven’t really gotten their fair shot at life yet. Meanwhile, their families, especially the parents, were facing their own battles. It is unimaginable how a father or a mother could bear seeing their child suffer. Dealing with mortalities at the Pedia ward was difficult, to say the least, both for the loved ones left behind and for healthcare workers like us.

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A beacon of light within such a sad reality… It was a common sight at our HO Ward, having do-gooders come to share food, gifts, and time with our patients. :) These characters from Star Wars came not only once to cheer up patients and to wish them a speedy recovery! || Photo credit (c) Teedee Estrada

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And just like that, we’re in Week 5-6 of Pedia internship! Time to spend time with the newborns at the catchers’ area/NICU. First duty down, and it went pretty well! Here’s looking forward to more fun and learning! Can’t believe I actually worried about this rotation in the first place… Hehe!

Twinning! :) My first catch of  Pedia Internship is this live baby boy! Cutie! Photo taken and posted with mommy's permission
Twinning! :) My first catch of Pedia Internship is this live baby boy! Cutie! Photo taken and posted with mommy’s permission || Photo credit (c) Myza Espallardo
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