Tales from the SOD

Late post! This blog entry chronicles some of my favorite experiences from our Surgeon-on-Duty (SOD) rotation last August 12 – 25 2016 . It was a challenging yet fun two weeks that consisted of rough ER duties, seemingly endless OPD charting, and solo Minor OR stints.  

 

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Bringing a little dose of sunshine into the gloomy ACU! Team Sachi-TeeDee-Angeli-Biel, reporting for SOD! :D Photo grabbed from Biel Faundo (C)

 The Emergency Room can be a pretty tough place to handle, what with the need for quick and systematic action in facing what may be the difference between life and death. This is especially true for the UP-Philippine General Hospital, where patients come in overwhelming numbers on a daily basis.

And when you happen to be among the Surgery interns on duty at the SOD, you have to be prepared for the rush. Wounds of all sorts of shapes and sizes. Abdominal pain of varied character, severity, location, and radiation. The different shades of jaundice. Vomit there, vomit everywhere. Bleeding love. And there never seems to be a shortage of mauling cases. All these and more, and before you know it, it’s already 7AM or 7PM – shift over!

Tale 1. What Really Matters

Two patients arrive at the SOD, both sustaining multiple injuries after a vehicular crash. Our four-man intern team quickly divides into two and takes action – fast-chart, insert IV access, extract blood, prepare imaging requests, do skin tests for tetanus shots and antibiotics, and clean wounds. History reveals that our patients, who I shall pertain to as Girl and Boy from this point on, are sweethearts who were on an afternoon drive, and a mistake on Boy’s part caused their unfortunate accident.

Girl’s most obvious injury is her forehead laceration and Sachi goes to work on suturing. With the injury not so deep and not so long, the repair is easily finished, the wound cleaned and dressed. Meanwhile, I grab a 1L bottle of plain LR, a macroset, and an IV cannula and proceeded to insert an access on Boy.

“Naku, Doktora. Tatahiin niyo na po ba ako?” Boy asks, clearly a bit nervous about getting stitched up, as I tie a tourniquet (actually a tourni-glove) around his left hand. I reassure him and say that I’d only be inserting an IV line for now.

Holding up his hand as I try to look for the ideal vein to puncture, Boy takes a deep breath. “Masakit po ba ‘yun?” 

“May anesthesia naman po, sir. Pero siyempre, may kaunting sakit pa rin sa umpisa,“I reply. I get the IV cannula inserted with no problems and set up the line.

Eh, yung kasama ko po? Kumusta siya?” Boy asks, peering outside the suturing area where his girlfriend was stationed.

Ah, OK na siya. Natahi na ‘yung sugat niya.” 

He sighs in relief. “Mabuti naman. Ang mahalaga kasi, siya…” 

Amazing how love can make a person think so much of that special someone to the point of forgetting himself. Boy’s thoughts are so concentrated on how Girl is that he failed to recognize that he’s the one in a much problematic state. While Girl only sustained an easily repairable forehead laceration, Boy suffered what appeared to be an intense hit to the inguinal area, causing gross swelling and erythema of his scrotal area. One can imagine just how much that hurts, but what really matters most to him at that moment was how Girl was.

#TrueLoveAtTheER How sweet! Pa-CBG naman po ‘dyan! 

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No task is too great for this awesome duty team! :)

Tale 2. While I Can

One of things I like the most about OPD clinic days is the fact that you get to sit down, talk and examine patients at a relaxed environment. In contrast to the super fast-paced and confusing ER environment, the OPD actually allows you to take time to build rapport, the first step in any history-taking and physical examination lecture I’ve ever attended since I started medical school.

My team is relatively toxic when it comes to OPD days. Our new patient numbers always approaches or even exceeds 50, meaning charting galore! On one particular day, everyone seemed to have urinary problems, requiring me to do the digital rectal examination more than a couple of times. Oh boy…

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The feeling when you finish charting a patient only to find 10 more new charts freshly piled on the nurse’s desk… Sigh. Chart pa moooore! || The aftermath of 53 OPD consults

My patient encounter with a 80-year-old grandmother, who we shall call Lola in this story, was particularly memorable. She comes in unassisted, shuffling towards the seat in front of my desk, looking a bit winded from walking, but with a smile pasted on her face nonetheless. I greet her with an equally enthusiastic smile and proceeded with “Ano pong pinunta niyo rito sa PGH?”.

I still find it a little striking how patients can put so much trust in their doctors, especially ones they have just met, as to immediately reveal parts, if not their entire, life story. This is especially true when you actually succeed in building rapport in that short period of introduction. Lola immediately begins telling me about this mass she noticed on her left shoulder, a mass that started out small and that she ignored until it became big enough to catch her daughter’s attention. The conversation then strays away from her medical problem – the mass – and towards what I suspect is her more pressing problem, her family situation.

With times being as hard as they are right now, Lola is the one taking care of her grandchildren, even the one who brings them to school and cooks their baon. They were the real reason why it took her so long to consult about her shoulder mass. In fact, she wouldn’t be consulting at that moment, had it not been for her daughter’s insistence.

Sabi niya sa akin,  baka kung ano na ‘yan, ‘nay. Ipatingin mo na…” Lola narrated, her eyes a bit watery. “Lumalaki na. Hanggang kaya natin, ipatingin mo na at ipa-opera…”  She dabs at her eyes before continuing. “Ang sa akin naman, OK lang kahit anong manyari sa akin. Matanda na ako eh. Pero para sa kanila, hanggang kaya ko, sige. Magpapatingin na lang ako…”

I did my best to reassure Lola, that we would do our best to help her. Physical examination points to a simple cyst and excision seems to be an easy option for her. She looked relieved to hear that it didn’t appear to be anything serious and thanked me for taking time to see her.

Our patients truly are our greatest teachers, more so than any textbook, trans, reviewer, or lecture. Life can be a very confusing journey, with its endless ups and downs, twists and turns. But as Lola said, for the people we love the most, we must do what we can while we can. No one knows what lies ahead, so we have to cherish the present.

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Hooray for the clingiest SOD duty team ever! Hanggang sa Radio, nagpunta para sabay-sabay pa ring uuwi. Thank you to our SODs, Dr. Joan Flor, Dr. Denor Sotalbo, and Dr. Kat Guillermo, for everything. On to the wards~!  Photo grabbed from Biel Faundo (C)

 

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